Let’s be clear—having a degree does not get you a job. Forty years ago, a bachelor’s degree was almost a guarantee of a job upon graduation, and a lifetime career. Those days are gone. While those with degrees tend to be compensated better than those without, this is not a hard and fast rule. You must be able to talk to your interviewer about your experiences and the knowledge you gained, and relate those to the role for which you’re being considered. Best of luck!

A big problem for a lot of new students is a combination of homesickness and a feeling of not quite belonging. A solution? Consider joining a select group (and be careful not to go overboard) -- student organizations, clubs, sororities or fraternities, or sports teams. You'll make new friends, learn new skills, and feel more connected to your school.
Never skip a study time. Always sit down at your station at study time. Do this even if you don’t have pressing homework to complete. Keeping a regular schedule will help prevent procrastination. If you find yourself sitting at your desk and looking at your books, but not reading, remind yourself that you only have to study for a short amount of time. Set a timer. At the end of that time, close the book and give yourself a break.
Know that when the time comes to begin looking for your first internship or full-time job, LiveCareer has your resume and cover letter writing needs covered. Use our resume builder and cover letter builder to craft top-notch documents in no time at all, or work from our resume examples and cover letter examples, all of which are organized by job title and industry.
Staying energized is another one of the most important study tips for college students because your brain must be able to focus on the subject at hand for a long period of time. Try eating healthy foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and drink plenty of water. Coffee usually gives you a quick burst of energy, but it often leads to exhaustion if you drink too much of it, so keep your caffeine consumption to a minimum.
I was/am a nontraditional student (about five to seven years older than most students at my university), so this was not quite in my realm, but I was often jealous of the many opportunities afforded to these students. Yes, you have to go to social events. Yes, you might get categorized as a snob or fill-in-the-inappropriate-name-blank, but you really can benefit from the social network and resources (such as old tests).
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