Dr. Randall S. Hansen is founder of Quintessential Careers, one of the oldest and most comprehensive career development sites on the Web, as well CEO of EmpoweringSites.com. He is also founder of MyCollegeSuccessStory.com and EnhanceMyVocabulary.com. Dr. Hansen is also a published author, with several books, chapters in books, and hundreds of articles. He's often quoted in the media and conducts empowering workshops around the country. Finally, Dr. Hansen is also an educator, having taught at the college level for more than 15 years. Visit his personal Website or reach him by email at randall(at)quintcareers.com. Check out Dr. Hansen on GooglePlus.

One of my biggest regrets in life was intentionally falling out of touch with high school friends. I had joined a group of people who convinced me that the only important thing was their group and if friends or family did not understand, they should be cut off (read: I got into a pyramid-like scheme). I missed out on so much, and now the stream of Facebook updates from my high school friends makes me sad.
Usually, assignments in online colleges are submitted through an educational platform such as Blackboard, Desire to Learn (D2L), or something comparable. There will usually be an embedded feature which allows you to upload your assignment so that your instructor can see, review, and grade it. If you cannot find this feature, email your instructor for help.
Let’s be clear—having a degree does not get you a job. Forty years ago, a bachelor’s degree was almost a guarantee of a job upon graduation, and a lifetime career. Those days are gone. While those with degrees tend to be compensated better than those without, this is not a hard and fast rule. You must be able to talk to your interviewer about your experiences and the knowledge you gained, and relate those to the role for which you’re being considered. Best of luck!
Never skip a study time. Always sit down at your station at study time. Do this even if you don’t have pressing homework to complete. Keeping a regular schedule will help prevent procrastination. If you find yourself sitting at your desk and looking at your books, but not reading, remind yourself that you only have to study for a short amount of time. Set a timer. At the end of that time, close the book and give yourself a break.
Make sure your computer is protected against malware. If you have Windows 8 or 10, you should already have Windows Defender (but make sure it’s on and up-to-date). For further protection, you can pair that with the free version of Malwarebytes. It also doesn’t hurt to install an ad blocker like Ublock Origin (which is what I use in order to block malicious ads before they even get the chance to load – you can always whitelist the sites you trust if you want to support them.
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