Debra Wheatman is a certified professional resume writer and career coach, and the president of Careers Done Write, a leader in professional resume and career services. Debra is a globally recognized expert in the field of career planning and management, with more than 18 years of experience in corporate human resources. She has formed partnerships with more than 10,000 job seekers, advising people from diverse backgrounds in connection with career advancement, and can package executive level skills and accomplishments in a compelling and creative way to generate interest on behalf of decision makers at leading corporations. Debra has been featured on Fox Business News and CNN, and has been quoted in such publications as The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and Forbes.com. You can reach Debra directly at debra@careersdonewrite.com or via phone at 732.444.2854.
I was/am a nontraditional student (about five to seven years older than most students at my university), so this was not quite in my realm, but I was often jealous of the many opportunities afforded to these students. Yes, you have to go to social events. Yes, you might get categorized as a snob or fill-in-the-inappropriate-name-blank, but you really can benefit from the social network and resources (such as old tests).
There are several test taking strategies, such as making acronyms or making visual pictures, so find out what works best for you and use it! Professors are full of ideas, so don’t be afraid to schedule an office visit with them to ensure that you’re on the right track. Oftentimes, they will give you pointers and guide you through all the material that you need to study.
Since a large part of online coursework will be in written form, there is an opportunity to submit well-written, polished work that will positively impact your grades. Good grammar and correct punctuation will help convey your message accurately, and it’s always a good idea to be clear and concise in your writing. I suggest reading Write to the Point by Bill Stott for direction in good writing.
Video: Tax Tips for Teachers Take Advantage of Two Education Tax Credits How to Calculate Your Lifetime Learning Tax Credit on IRS Form 8863 Guide to IRS Form 1099-Q: Payments from Qualified Education Programs Learn About the New College Tax Credit Sending Kids to College The Lowdown on Education Tax Breaks Video: Guide to IRS Form 1098-T Tuition Statement Video: What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? What is the Educator Expense Tax Deduction? What is a 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Tax Tips When Sending Kids to Private or Public Schools How to Report FAFSA College Money on a Federal Tax Return Tax Deductions for Voluntary Interest Payments on Student Loans What Are Education Tax Credits? Tax Tips for Teachers: Deducting Out-of-Pocket Classroom Expenses What is IRS Form 1099-Q? What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? Tax Tips for New College Graduates Video: Top College Tax Deductions and Credits Can I Deduct My Computer for School on Taxes? Cash for College: Tax-Free 529 Plans Video: Tax Tips for Students Bigger, Better College Tax Credit Video: What Is a 529 Plan Contribution? Information on 529 Plans About Student Loans and Tax Credits What is Form 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Statement? Taxes for Grads: Do Scholarships Count as Taxable Income? What Is the IRS Form 8863? Do You Have to Claim Pell Grant Money on Your Taxes? What Is the American Opportunity Tax Credit? What Is IRS Form 8917? Deduction for Higher Education
Never skip a study time. Always sit down at your station at study time. Do this even if you don’t have pressing homework to complete. Keeping a regular schedule will help prevent procrastination. If you find yourself sitting at your desk and looking at your books, but not reading, remind yourself that you only have to study for a short amount of time. Set a timer. At the end of that time, close the book and give yourself a break.
Do you know how many courses you can take at a time and still remain sane? Enroll part-time and find out. Plan on each course requiring about five hours of study time per week. Some courses, especially ones where you may need tutoring, can require up to seven hours of study time per week. If you plan to enroll in two courses, be prepared to put aside 10 to 14 hours of study time each week.
Having a planner can be a lifesaver in college. Here, you should write down all assignments that you have, deadlines and test dates. This can save you a lot of stress down the line when you discover that you have a test tomorrow or a research paper due at the end of the week. Try color-coding your subjects so that you know exactly what needs to be done. Trust me, this is one of those study tips for college students that you don’t want to overlook.

A truly great resume should highlight your achievements and immediately answer the hiring manager’s top-of-mind question: “Can this person solve my problem?” Not only should the education section of your resume be concise, but it should also relate to the job you are seeking. If you’re a recent graduate, you’ll need to put a bit more focus on your education section since you likely don’t have a lot of professional work world experience yet. You don’t want to include every single course you’ve ever taken, but you also don’t want to merely list your credentials.
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Some people seek college teaching jobs with no clear understanding of what it will take to succeed. This is the case for many new part-time, or adjunct, faculty members. An honest self-assessment can help a would-be instructor make the right decision, one that can lead to a rewarding part-time or full-time career teaching career. In some cases, however, the right decision will be to look for other employment. Th ..... READ MORE
If you have more than five years of work experience, don’t lead with the education section of your resume. Hiring managers will be more interested in your work history and your accomplishments in your career than in your degree. Also, if you’ve attended multiple institutions to earn your degree, only list the institution that conferred the degree upon you. It doesn’t matter that you started at a community college and then transferred to a four-year university. All that’s important is that you have the degree.
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Make sure your computer is protected against malware. If you have Windows 8 or 10, you should already have Windows Defender (but make sure it’s on and up-to-date). For further protection, you can pair that with the free version of Malwarebytes. It also doesn’t hurt to install an ad blocker like Ublock Origin (which is what I use in order to block malicious ads before they even get the chance to load – you can always whitelist the sites you trust if you want to support them.
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