It began as a serious article about college teaching mistakes. Then it morphed into an article published on HubPages.com entitled You Might Be a Redneck College Teacher If … Is there a serious lesson to be learned from this silly article? Know What You Need to Know Many of the mistakes new college instructors make result from assumptions … incorrect assumptions that is. Unlike what is suggested in the a ..... READ MORE
Form a Parent Pool with Fellow Online Students Many online students attend local colleges. If that’s you, this means your fellow online students likely live close to you—and they may be parents, too. Tap those connections. Ask people in your class if they want to start a parent pool. You could watch your classmate’s kids on Wednesday nights when she has calculus in exchange for her watching your kids during your Monday night computer programming course.

While you might think “duh, that’s obvious,” a reliable Internet connection is not always available in your area or deemed too expensive. You’ll need to have a cable modem or a fast DSL connection in order to connect to your courses. Reliable is the key word here. If your Internet connection has a tendency to crash your browser or drop altogether, you’ll need to diagnose the source of a problem or find a new way to access the Web.
A lot of problems first-year students face can be traced back to an illness that kept them away from classes for an extended period of time that led to a downward spiraling effect. Get enough sleep, take your vitamins, and eat right. If you haven't heard the jokes about college food, you soon will. And without mom or dad there to serve you a balanced meal, you may be tempted to go for those extra fries or cookies. Stay healthy and avoid the dreaded extra "Freshman 15" pounds by sticking to a balanced diet.
Not sure how to list your college degree (or the college coursework you have accumulated if you didn't finish your degree) on your resume? How should you list your expected graduation date if you're an undergraduate student? What if you didn't go to college? How about if you've already graduated? Alternatively, what do you do if you haven't yet graduated but intend to complete your degree at some point in time? 
The one exception to this rule is in an academic or scientific curriculum vitae. Those fields are very concerned about educational history. If you are writing a true C.V., then you should lead with your education. Ensure that you list your degrees in order of hierarchy—you’d be shocked by how many people have extensive education sections in which their doctoral degrees are listed last! Include your thesis/dissertation topic and advisor, if applicable.
Only include your GPA on your resume if you are a recent graduate, and only if it is above a 3.5. In most industries, a GPA is not a deciding factor in entry-level hiring. A few  still want it (investment banking comes to mind), but most do not. If you’re a recent graduate, you should also include any academic honors, such as scholarships, dean’s list, and cum laude status. Again, this is only for recent graduates. Everyone else should leave their GPA off the resume!
Having a planner can be a lifesaver in college. Here, you should write down all assignments that you have, deadlines and test dates. This can save you a lot of stress down the line when you discover that you have a test tomorrow or a research paper due at the end of the week. Try color-coding your subjects so that you know exactly what needs to be done. Trust me, this is one of those study tips for college students that you don’t want to overlook.
The most common culprit of free time is TV. Most adults spend about 20 hours per week watching TV. We are not saying you should never watch TV; we’re suggesting that you give up watching the TV shows that do not really interest you. Free up your time. Record what you love for viewing on demand and nix the rest of that dead TV time. Reducing your TV time by 10 hours per week will result in 10 hours of free time to devote to your online education. Ten hours of free time per week is enough to complete that long-delayed dream of earning a college degree.
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Perhaps you were class president in high school. Or perhaps you were a member of the honor society. You could have graduated in the top percentile of your graduating class; perhaps you were even valedictorian. Maybe your were in the honors program or the International Baccalaureate program. Actually, it doesn't really matter what you did in high school as you make the transition to college. High school success (or lack of it) doesn't automatically apply to college.
If you are having trouble with a subject or want to make sure you are studying the right concepts, make a list of questions to ask your professor. Most are open to answering any questions you have about the material or their tests. If you know the test is going to be essay, find out exactly what the professor wants you to focus on so that you can achieve the maximum amount of points possible.
In fact, once you fully recognize that everything in your life ultimately happens for your own growth, progress, and development—so you can achieve your goals and dreams—your perception works in your favor. You soon process and respond to your experience of life differently, for your advantage. That’s the essence of becoming “rationally optimistic.”
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