Some people seek college teaching jobs with no clear understanding of what it will take to succeed. This is the case for many new part-time, or adjunct, faculty members. An honest self-assessment can help a would-be instructor make the right decision, one that can lead to a rewarding part-time or full-time career teaching career. In some cases, however, the right decision will be to look for other employment. Th ..... READ MORE
Perhaps you were class president in high school. Or perhaps you were a member of the honor society. You could have graduated in the top percentile of your graduating class; perhaps you were even valedictorian. Maybe your were in the honors program or the International Baccalaureate program. Actually, it doesn't really matter what you did in high school as you make the transition to college. High school success (or lack of it) doesn't automatically apply to college.
When adults—especially moms and dads—think about going back to school, many see no way to squeeze college into their hectic routines. But it is possible—and we’re here with tips for success in online courses. Attending college online helps with that time crunch. Not having to commute to a campus saves adult students several hours per week. These stolen hours can then be applied to home study time. Truth is, the average working American has about 30 hours of free time per week. That’s right: 30 hours. The key is learning how to manage your time tightly.
If you have more than five years of work experience, don’t lead with the education section of your resume. Hiring managers will be more interested in your work history and your accomplishments in your career than in your degree. Also, if you’ve attended multiple institutions to earn your degree, only list the institution that conferred the degree upon you. It doesn’t matter that you started at a community college and then transferred to a four-year university. All that’s important is that you have the degree.
Find mentors. Going through something yourself is often the best way to learn, but that doesn’t mean you have to re-invent the wheel entirely and can’t get guidance. Many of the world’s most successful people — from businessmen to politicians to writers to musicians — found a mentor early on who represented an ideal that they wanted to become and took a fervent interest in them.
You've done all the prep work -- you've gotten good grades in high school, scored well in the world of standardized testing, and been accepted into the college you want to attend -- so enjoy all your hard work while laying the groundwork for a successful college career. Don't be a statistic; be determined to make it through your freshman year -- and beyond. Take advantage of your network of new friends and professors, have fun while learning as much as you can, and get the most out of your college experience.
Book Shelf No.1   The books for college instructors here on Book Shelf No. 1 have been selected specifically for new college instructors as well as for experienced instructors who want to brush up on teaching basics. Most college instructors enter the classroom for the first time with little or no formal formal training on how to teach. Many of them find out the hard way that college teaching is not easy. It r ..... READ MORE
One of my biggest regrets in life was intentionally falling out of touch with high school friends. I had joined a group of people who convinced me that the only important thing was their group and if friends or family did not understand, they should be cut off (read: I got into a pyramid-like scheme). I missed out on so much, and now the stream of Facebook updates from my high school friends makes me sad.
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