A lot of problems first-year students face can be traced back to an illness that kept them away from classes for an extended period of time that led to a downward spiraling effect. Get enough sleep, take your vitamins, and eat right. If you haven't heard the jokes about college food, you soon will. And without mom or dad there to serve you a balanced meal, you may be tempted to go for those extra fries or cookies. Stay healthy and avoid the dreaded extra "Freshman 15" pounds by sticking to a balanced diet.
The most common culprit of free time is TV. Most adults spend about 20 hours per week watching TV. We are not saying you should never watch TV; we’re suggesting that you give up watching the TV shows that do not really interest you. Free up your time. Record what you love for viewing on demand and nix the rest of that dead TV time. Reducing your TV time by 10 hours per week will result in 10 hours of free time to devote to your online education. Ten hours of free time per week is enough to complete that long-delayed dream of earning a college degree.
Appreciate your summers and use them wisely. Don’t let the system brainwash you into thinking that you need to do something this summer to get that internship next summer, which will lead to that other internship and then That Job. Travel to Japan or Patagonia, write a book, read, spend time with family, learn a new language or skill, follow things that interest you, that cliché but wise voice in your heart.
Online courses are popular ways for students to earn college credit while balancing working and other time commitments. Since you are working through the course on your own time, it is important to follow a specific schedule and to complete your reading and assignments online. You may be taking an online class through your two or four year college or through an online college program. Regardless of the class type, there are specific things you can do to ensure that you succeed.
If you have friends in your classes, you may want to consider holding a study group every week. Here, you can bounce ideas and questions off of each other so that you can better understand the material. Everyone learns in different ways, so you may learn some test-taking strategies from your classmates. Study groups are especially helpful for college students, especially when going over a study guide for an upcoming test.
You've done all the prep work -- you've gotten good grades in high school, scored well in the world of standardized testing, and been accepted into the college you want to attend -- so enjoy all your hard work while laying the groundwork for a successful college career. Don't be a statistic; be determined to make it through your freshman year -- and beyond. Take advantage of your network of new friends and professors, have fun while learning as much as you can, and get the most out of your college experience.
There are several test taking strategies, such as making acronyms or making visual pictures, so find out what works best for you and use it! Professors are full of ideas, so don’t be afraid to schedule an office visit with them to ensure that you’re on the right track. Oftentimes, they will give you pointers and guide you through all the material that you need to study.
Video: Tax Tips for Teachers Take Advantage of Two Education Tax Credits How to Calculate Your Lifetime Learning Tax Credit on IRS Form 8863 Guide to IRS Form 1099-Q: Payments from Qualified Education Programs Learn About the New College Tax Credit Sending Kids to College The Lowdown on Education Tax Breaks Video: Guide to IRS Form 1098-T Tuition Statement Video: What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? What is the Educator Expense Tax Deduction? What is a 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Tax Tips When Sending Kids to Private or Public Schools How to Report FAFSA College Money on a Federal Tax Return Tax Deductions for Voluntary Interest Payments on Student Loans What Are Education Tax Credits? Tax Tips for Teachers: Deducting Out-of-Pocket Classroom Expenses What is IRS Form 1099-Q? What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? Tax Tips for New College Graduates Video: Top College Tax Deductions and Credits Can I Deduct My Computer for School on Taxes? Cash for College: Tax-Free 529 Plans Video: Tax Tips for Students Bigger, Better College Tax Credit Video: What Is a 529 Plan Contribution? Information on 529 Plans About Student Loans and Tax Credits What is Form 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Statement? Taxes for Grads: Do Scholarships Count as Taxable Income? What Is the IRS Form 8863? Do You Have to Claim Pell Grant Money on Your Taxes? What Is the American Opportunity Tax Credit? What Is IRS Form 8917? Deduction for Higher Education
The SCTOD data provides patient survival estimates for a disease at a specific center and also develops summary slides of outcomes data. The Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Indications and Outcomes page will also show the disease-specific indications and outcomes, as well as comparison of HCT outcomes and trends by age, disease stage, and transplant type.  Use the… Read More »
On your first study day each week, read any required materials and take notes. Go back a few days later to review your reading notes and work on any written homework or other assignments. Now that you have identified your regular study times, tell everyone in the family. Post a notice on the refrigerator that you will be studying at predetermined times each week. Ask family members to respect this time. Make sure everyone understands you are not to be disturbed during your study time.
Form a Parent Pool with Fellow Online Students Many online students attend local colleges. If that’s you, this means your fellow online students likely live close to you—and they may be parents, too. Tap those connections. Ask people in your class if they want to start a parent pool. You could watch your classmate’s kids on Wednesday nights when she has calculus in exchange for her watching your kids during your Monday night computer programming course.
Some people seek college teaching jobs with no clear understanding of what it will take to succeed. This is the case for many new part-time, or adjunct, faculty members. An honest self-assessment can help a would-be instructor make the right decision, one that can lead to a rewarding part-time or full-time career teaching career. In some cases, however, the right decision will be to look for other employment. Th ..... READ MORE
If you have more than five years of work experience, don’t lead with the education section of your resume. Hiring managers will be more interested in your work history and your accomplishments in your career than in your degree. Also, if you’ve attended multiple institutions to earn your degree, only list the institution that conferred the degree upon you. It doesn’t matter that you started at a community college and then transferred to a four-year university. All that’s important is that you have the degree.
At LiveCareer, we live and breathe the belief that we can help people transform their work lives, and so do our contributors. Our experts come from a variety of backgrounds but have one thing in common: they are authorities on the job market. From journalists with years of experience covering workforce topics, to academics who study the theory behind employment and staffing, to certified resume writers whose expertise in the creation of application documents offers our readers insights into how to best wow recruiters and hiring managers, LiveCareer’s stable of expert writers are among the best in the business. Whether you are new to the workforce, are a seasoned professional, or somewhere in between, LiveCareer’s contributors will help you move the needle on your career and get the job you want faster than you think.
Video: Tax Tips for Teachers Take Advantage of Two Education Tax Credits How to Calculate Your Lifetime Learning Tax Credit on IRS Form 8863 Guide to IRS Form 1099-Q: Payments from Qualified Education Programs Learn About the New College Tax Credit Sending Kids to College The Lowdown on Education Tax Breaks Video: Guide to IRS Form 1098-T Tuition Statement Video: What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? What is the Educator Expense Tax Deduction? What is a 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Tax Tips When Sending Kids to Private or Public Schools How to Report FAFSA College Money on a Federal Tax Return Tax Deductions for Voluntary Interest Payments on Student Loans What Are Education Tax Credits? Tax Tips for Teachers: Deducting Out-of-Pocket Classroom Expenses What is IRS Form 1099-Q? What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? Tax Tips for New College Graduates Video: Top College Tax Deductions and Credits Can I Deduct My Computer for School on Taxes? Cash for College: Tax-Free 529 Plans Video: Tax Tips for Students Bigger, Better College Tax Credit Video: What Is a 529 Plan Contribution? Information on 529 Plans About Student Loans and Tax Credits What is Form 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Statement? Taxes for Grads: Do Scholarships Count as Taxable Income? What Is the IRS Form 8863? Do You Have to Claim Pell Grant Money on Your Taxes? What Is the American Opportunity Tax Credit? What Is IRS Form 8917? Deduction for Higher Education
Know that when the time comes to begin looking for your first internship or full-time job, LiveCareer has your resume and cover letter writing needs covered. Use our resume builder and cover letter builder to craft top-notch documents in no time at all, or work from our resume examples and cover letter examples, all of which are organized by job title and industry.
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On your first study day each week, read any required materials and take notes. Go back a few days later to review your reading notes and work on any written homework or other assignments. Now that you have identified your regular study times, tell everyone in the family. Post a notice on the refrigerator that you will be studying at predetermined times each week. Ask family members to respect this time. Make sure everyone understands you are not to be disturbed during your study time.
Let’s be clear—having a degree does not get you a job. Forty years ago, a bachelor’s degree was almost a guarantee of a job upon graduation, and a lifetime career. Those days are gone. While those with degrees tend to be compensated better than those without, this is not a hard and fast rule. You must be able to talk to your interviewer about your experiences and the knowledge you gained, and relate those to the role for which you’re being considered. Best of luck!
39) If your roommate is doing something that bothers you, ask yourself the following three questions: 1) Am I being reasonable in being bothered by this? 2) What's the best way to talk to my roommate about this? 3) What are some solutions to this issue? If all else fails and the issue is very important to you and you've talked to your roommate to no avail, talk to your Resident Assistant.
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