If you have more than five years of work experience, don’t lead with the education section of your resume. Hiring managers will be more interested in your work history and your accomplishments in your career than in your degree. Also, if you’ve attended multiple institutions to earn your degree, only list the institution that conferred the degree upon you. It doesn’t matter that you started at a community college and then transferred to a four-year university. All that’s important is that you have the degree.

You don’t do that by going into your interview and talking about your views on symbolism in 1950s film noir. You do that by ensuring you gain practical experience while you’re a student, either by working part-time, or by doing an internship. Yes, part-time retail jobs teach important workplace skills, such as cash management, customer service, and inventory management. An internship can provide more “professional” experience related to your major. If you’ve held a job while working on your degree, or if you’ve done an internship, be sure to put those on your resume.
Let’s be clear—having a degree does not get you a job. Forty years ago, a bachelor’s degree was almost a guarantee of a job upon graduation, and a lifetime career. Those days are gone. While those with degrees tend to be compensated better than those without, this is not a hard and fast rule. You must be able to talk to your interviewer about your experiences and the knowledge you gained, and relate those to the role for which you’re being considered. Best of luck!

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Find out what colleges and universities look for when hiring part-time (a.k.a. adjunct) college instructors and how they go about that process. A 2009 Money magazine article entitled “5 Ways to Pump up Your Income” recommended college teaching to part-time employment seekers. At many colleges, there are far more adjunct instructors than full-time faculty members. This means there are many part-time opportuniti ..... READ MORE
Before you apply to an online program, make sure you know what online learning is all about. It’s not for everyone! Is face-to-face interaction with teachers and classmates important to you? Some students find they learn better in a physical classroom while others are comfortable learning independently. How good are you at managing your time? Online learning requires high autonomy and high accountability.
Book Shelf No.1   The books for college instructors here on Book Shelf No. 1 have been selected specifically for new college instructors as well as for experienced instructors who want to brush up on teaching basics. Most college instructors enter the classroom for the first time with little or no formal formal training on how to teach. Many of them find out the hard way that college teaching is not easy. It r ..... READ MORE
Let’s be clear—having a degree does not get you a job. Forty years ago, a bachelor’s degree was almost a guarantee of a job upon graduation, and a lifetime career. Those days are gone. While those with degrees tend to be compensated better than those without, this is not a hard and fast rule. You must be able to talk to your interviewer about your experiences and the knowledge you gained, and relate those to the role for which you’re being considered. Best of luck!
It began as a serious article about college teaching mistakes. Then it morphed into an article published on HubPages.com entitled You Might Be a Redneck College Teacher If … Is there a serious lesson to be learned from this silly article? Know What You Need to Know Many of the mistakes new college instructors make result from assumptions … incorrect assumptions that is. Unlike what is suggested in the a ..... READ MORE
I was/am a nontraditional student (about five to seven years older than most students at my university), so this was not quite in my realm, but I was often jealous of the many opportunities afforded to these students. Yes, you have to go to social events. Yes, you might get categorized as a snob or fill-in-the-inappropriate-name-blank, but you really can benefit from the social network and resources (such as old tests).
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