Not sure how to list your college degree (or the college coursework you have accumulated if you didn't finish your degree) on your resume? How should you list your expected graduation date if you're an undergraduate student? What if you didn't go to college? How about if you've already graduated? Alternatively, what do you do if you haven't yet graduated but intend to complete your degree at some point in time? 


Form a Parent Pool with Fellow Online Students Many online students attend local colleges. If that’s you, this means your fellow online students likely live close to you—and they may be parents, too. Tap those connections. Ask people in your class if they want to start a parent pool. You could watch your classmate’s kids on Wednesday nights when she has calculus in exchange for her watching your kids during your Monday night computer programming course.
People do not handle going back to school in the same way. Some are very excited about being a college kid, so they tell the world about their new online courses. Others are embarrassed that they do not have a formal education. The latter tend to keep quiet that they are going to college online because they do not want to draw attention to the fact that they have not yet earned a college degree. (You would be surprised to learn how many highly successful people nearing retirement age go through their entire careers without the aid of a college degree!) Keeping quiet about college will make it difficult for you to garner support at work. For example, you may need to leave work 15 minutes early on Wednesdays to attend your required online class chat session. Many employers will subsidize at least a part of employee’s tuition and training bills. Don’t forget to ask about tuition assistance plans at your place of employment. If you work for a small company, try asking for tuition assistance to cover the expense of specific online courses that may directly correlate to your work.
When adults—especially moms and dads—think about going back to school, many see no way to squeeze college into their hectic routines. But it is possible—and we’re here with tips for success in online courses. Attending college online helps with that time crunch. Not having to commute to a campus saves adult students several hours per week. These stolen hours can then be applied to home study time. Truth is, the average working American has about 30 hours of free time per week. That’s right: 30 hours. The key is learning how to manage your time tightly.

Appreciate your summers and use them wisely. Don’t let the system brainwash you into thinking that you need to do something this summer to get that internship next summer, which will lead to that other internship and then That Job. Travel to Japan or Patagonia, write a book, read, spend time with family, learn a new language or skill, follow things that interest you, that cliché but wise voice in your heart.


Having a planner can be a lifesaver in college. Here, you should write down all assignments that you have, deadlines and test dates. This can save you a lot of stress down the line when you discover that you have a test tomorrow or a research paper due at the end of the week. Try color-coding your subjects so that you know exactly what needs to be done. Trust me, this is one of those study tips for college students that you don’t want to overlook.
This is the person who will help you with course conflicts, adding or dropping courses, scheduling of classes for future semesters, deciding on majors and minors. This person is a key resource for you -- and should be the person you turn to with any academic issues or conflicts. And don't be afraid of requesting another adviser if you don't click with the one first assigned to you.
Video: Tax Tips for Teachers Take Advantage of Two Education Tax Credits How to Calculate Your Lifetime Learning Tax Credit on IRS Form 8863 Guide to IRS Form 1099-Q: Payments from Qualified Education Programs Learn About the New College Tax Credit Sending Kids to College The Lowdown on Education Tax Breaks Video: Guide to IRS Form 1098-T Tuition Statement Video: What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? What is the Educator Expense Tax Deduction? What is a 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Tax Tips When Sending Kids to Private or Public Schools How to Report FAFSA College Money on a Federal Tax Return Tax Deductions for Voluntary Interest Payments on Student Loans What Are Education Tax Credits? Tax Tips for Teachers: Deducting Out-of-Pocket Classroom Expenses What is IRS Form 1099-Q? What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? Tax Tips for New College Graduates Video: Top College Tax Deductions and Credits Can I Deduct My Computer for School on Taxes? Cash for College: Tax-Free 529 Plans Video: Tax Tips for Students Bigger, Better College Tax Credit Video: What Is a 529 Plan Contribution? Information on 529 Plans About Student Loans and Tax Credits What is Form 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Statement? Taxes for Grads: Do Scholarships Count as Taxable Income? What Is the IRS Form 8863? Do You Have to Claim Pell Grant Money on Your Taxes? What Is the American Opportunity Tax Credit? What Is IRS Form 8917? Deduction for Higher Education
Hospitals in NSW experienced “unprecedented” patient demand over winter, figures show, as the nurses’ union calls for more staff. Data from the Bureau of Health Information reveals 764,410 patient presentations in NSW hospitals between July and September 2019. NSW Health deputy secretary Susan Pearce says the increase came on the back of the longest flu… Read More »
The SCTOD data provides patient survival estimates for a disease at a specific center and also develops summary slides of outcomes data. The Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Indications and Outcomes page will also show the disease-specific indications and outcomes, as well as comparison of HCT outcomes and trends by age, disease stage, and transplant type.  Use the… Read More »
For us onlooking or partaking upperclassmen, that feeling isn’t too distant. As a freshman, the sense of being lost in a big new world was exciting, but at the same time I treasured every bit of advice I could get. And there are still many things I wish I would have known then. Now that I’m a few years older, I thought I’d share some thoughts. More importantly, I went around and asked some of the most accomplished Penn students for what recommendations they’d give to freshmen.
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