Only include your GPA on your resume if you are a recent graduate, and only if it is above a 3.5. In most industries, a GPA is not a deciding factor in entry-level hiring. A few  still want it (investment banking comes to mind), but most do not. If you’re a recent graduate, you should also include any academic honors, such as scholarships, dean’s list, and cum laude status. Again, this is only for recent graduates. Everyone else should leave their GPA off the resume!
Only include your GPA on your resume if you are a recent graduate, and only if it is above a 3.5. In most industries, a GPA is not a deciding factor in entry-level hiring. A few  still want it (investment banking comes to mind), but most do not. If you’re a recent graduate, you should also include any academic honors, such as scholarships, dean’s list, and cum laude status. Again, this is only for recent graduates. Everyone else should leave their GPA off the resume!
If you are having trouble with a subject or want to make sure you are studying the right concepts, make a list of questions to ask your professor. Most are open to answering any questions you have about the material or their tests. If you know the test is going to be essay, find out exactly what the professor wants you to focus on so that you can achieve the maximum amount of points possible.

Usually, assignments in online colleges are submitted through an educational platform such as Blackboard, Desire to Learn (D2L), or something comparable. There will usually be an embedded feature which allows you to upload your assignment so that your instructor can see, review, and grade it. If you cannot find this feature, email your instructor for help.
Only include your GPA on your resume if you are a recent graduate, and only if it is above a 3.5. In most industries, a GPA is not a deciding factor in entry-level hiring. A few  still want it (investment banking comes to mind), but most do not. If you’re a recent graduate, you should also include any academic honors, such as scholarships, dean’s list, and cum laude status. Again, this is only for recent graduates. Everyone else should leave their GPA off the resume!
The one exception to this rule is in an academic or scientific curriculum vitae. Those fields are very concerned about educational history. If you are writing a true C.V., then you should lead with your education. Ensure that you list your degrees in order of hierarchy—you’d be shocked by how many people have extensive education sections in which their doctoral degrees are listed last! Include your thesis/dissertation topic and advisor, if applicable.

Find mentors. Going through something yourself is often the best way to learn, but that doesn’t mean you have to re-invent the wheel entirely and can’t get guidance. Many of the world’s most successful people — from businessmen to politicians to writers to musicians — found a mentor early on who represented an ideal that they wanted to become and took a fervent interest in them.
Some people seek college teaching jobs with no clear understanding of what it will take to succeed. This is the case for many new part-time, or adjunct, faculty members. An honest self-assessment can help a would-be instructor make the right decision, one that can lead to a rewarding part-time or full-time career teaching career. In some cases, however, the right decision will be to look for other employment. Th ..... READ MORE
Many adults return to college only to drop out three weeks into their studies. Why? One of the most common reasons is that online learning is hard work. It takes time. It takes discipline. It takes quiet. How can you guard against prematurely dropping out? The first step is to look around your house and find a place to claim as your own. Some students have found a quiet space in the garage, basement, attic or laundry room. After you’ve claimed your study space, make sure everyone in the family understands it is your sacred spot. Put up a DO NOT DISTURB sign and enforce it! Even if you can’t follow all the tips for success in online courses, your odds of staying in school will increase if you find a study spot.
Form a Parent Pool with Fellow Online Students Many online students attend local colleges. If that’s you, this means your fellow online students likely live close to you—and they may be parents, too. Tap those connections. Ask people in your class if they want to start a parent pool. You could watch your classmate’s kids on Wednesday nights when she has calculus in exchange for her watching your kids during your Monday night computer programming course.

Do you know how many courses you can take at a time and still remain sane? Enroll part-time and find out. Plan on each course requiring about five hours of study time per week. Some courses, especially ones where you may need tutoring, can require up to seven hours of study time per week. If you plan to enroll in two courses, be prepared to put aside 10 to 14 hours of study time each week.
Having a planner can be a lifesaver in college. Here, you should write down all assignments that you have, deadlines and test dates. This can save you a lot of stress down the line when you discover that you have a test tomorrow or a research paper due at the end of the week. Try color-coding your subjects so that you know exactly what needs to be done. Trust me, this is one of those study tips for college students that you don’t want to overlook.
Never skip a study time. Always sit down at your station at study time. Do this even if you don’t have pressing homework to complete. Keeping a regular schedule will help prevent procrastination. If you find yourself sitting at your desk and looking at your books, but not reading, remind yourself that you only have to study for a short amount of time. Set a timer. At the end of that time, close the book and give yourself a break.
Dr. Randall S. Hansen is founder of Quintessential Careers, one of the oldest and most comprehensive career development sites on the Web, as well CEO of EmpoweringSites.com. He is also founder of MyCollegeSuccessStory.com and EnhanceMyVocabulary.com. Dr. Hansen is also a published author, with several books, chapters in books, and hundreds of articles. He's often quoted in the media and conducts empowering workshops around the country. Finally, Dr. Hansen is also an educator, having taught at the college level for more than 15 years. Visit his personal Website or reach him by email at randall(at)quintcareers.com. Check out Dr. Hansen on GooglePlus.
You've done all the prep work -- you've gotten good grades in high school, scored well in the world of standardized testing, and been accepted into the college you want to attend -- so enjoy all your hard work while laying the groundwork for a successful college career. Don't be a statistic; be determined to make it through your freshman year -- and beyond. Take advantage of your network of new friends and professors, have fun while learning as much as you can, and get the most out of your college experience.
Find mentors. Going through something yourself is often the best way to learn, but that doesn’t mean you have to re-invent the wheel entirely and can’t get guidance. Many of the world’s most successful people — from businessmen to politicians to writers to musicians — found a mentor early on who represented an ideal that they wanted to become and took a fervent interest in them.
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