TUESDAY, Dec. 10, 2019 — Bullied teens are more likely to develop mental health problems, and people with mental health problems are also more likely to become bullies, researchers report. Even though many studies have shown that being bullied can leave mental scars, “no studies to date” have tested the notion that mental health issues… Read More »
There are several test taking strategies, such as making acronyms or making visual pictures, so find out what works best for you and use it! Professors are full of ideas, so don’t be afraid to schedule an office visit with them to ensure that you’re on the right track. Oftentimes, they will give you pointers and guide you through all the material that you need to study.
They are often referred to as “junior colleges,” but there is nothing junior about them. Community Colleges offer a wide array of high quality programs. * Community College Overview J.M. Beach referred to community colleges as a GATEWAY TO OPPORTUNITY. Many people, including President Obama, agree with this descriptor. The Obama administration approved $500 million to help community colleges prepare wo ..... READ MORE
Book Shelf No.1   The books for college instructors here on Book Shelf No. 1 have been selected specifically for new college instructors as well as for experienced instructors who want to brush up on teaching basics. Most college instructors enter the classroom for the first time with little or no formal formal training on how to teach. Many of them find out the hard way that college teaching is not easy. It r ..... READ MORE
A big problem for a lot of new students is a combination of homesickness and a feeling of not quite belonging. A solution? Consider joining a select group (and be careful not to go overboard) -- student organizations, clubs, sororities or fraternities, or sports teams. You'll make new friends, learn new skills, and feel more connected to your school.
There are several test taking strategies, such as making acronyms or making visual pictures, so find out what works best for you and use it! Professors are full of ideas, so don’t be afraid to schedule an office visit with them to ensure that you’re on the right track. Oftentimes, they will give you pointers and guide you through all the material that you need to study.
Perhaps you were class president in high school. Or perhaps you were a member of the honor society. You could have graduated in the top percentile of your graduating class; perhaps you were even valedictorian. Maybe your were in the honors program or the International Baccalaureate program. Actually, it doesn't really matter what you did in high school as you make the transition to college. High school success (or lack of it) doesn't automatically apply to college.

Perhaps you were class president in high school. Or perhaps you were a member of the honor society. You could have graduated in the top percentile of your graduating class; perhaps you were even valedictorian. Maybe your were in the honors program or the International Baccalaureate program. Actually, it doesn't really matter what you did in high school as you make the transition to college. High school success (or lack of it) doesn't automatically apply to college.
Video: Tax Tips for Teachers Take Advantage of Two Education Tax Credits How to Calculate Your Lifetime Learning Tax Credit on IRS Form 8863 Guide to IRS Form 1099-Q: Payments from Qualified Education Programs Learn About the New College Tax Credit Sending Kids to College The Lowdown on Education Tax Breaks Video: Guide to IRS Form 1098-T Tuition Statement Video: What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? What is the Educator Expense Tax Deduction? What is a 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Tax Tips When Sending Kids to Private or Public Schools How to Report FAFSA College Money on a Federal Tax Return Tax Deductions for Voluntary Interest Payments on Student Loans What Are Education Tax Credits? Tax Tips for Teachers: Deducting Out-of-Pocket Classroom Expenses What is IRS Form 1099-Q? What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? Tax Tips for New College Graduates Video: Top College Tax Deductions and Credits Can I Deduct My Computer for School on Taxes? Cash for College: Tax-Free 529 Plans Video: Tax Tips for Students Bigger, Better College Tax Credit Video: What Is a 529 Plan Contribution? Information on 529 Plans About Student Loans and Tax Credits What is Form 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Statement? Taxes for Grads: Do Scholarships Count as Taxable Income? What Is the IRS Form 8863? Do You Have to Claim Pell Grant Money on Your Taxes? What Is the American Opportunity Tax Credit? What Is IRS Form 8917? Deduction for Higher Education
Debra Wheatman is a certified professional resume writer and career coach, and the president of Careers Done Write, a leader in professional resume and career services. Debra is a globally recognized expert in the field of career planning and management, with more than 18 years of experience in corporate human resources. She has formed partnerships with more than 10,000 job seekers, advising people from diverse backgrounds in connection with career advancement, and can package executive level skills and accomplishments in a compelling and creative way to generate interest on behalf of decision makers at leading corporations. Debra has been featured on Fox Business News and CNN, and has been quoted in such publications as The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and Forbes.com. You can reach Debra directly at debra@careersdonewrite.com or via phone at 732.444.2854.
When adults—especially moms and dads—think about going back to school, many see no way to squeeze college into their hectic routines. But it is possible—and we’re here with tips for success in online courses. Attending college online helps with that time crunch. Not having to commute to a campus saves adult students several hours per week. These stolen hours can then be applied to home study time. Truth is, the average working American has about 30 hours of free time per week. That’s right: 30 hours. The key is learning how to manage your time tightly.
At LiveCareer, we live and breathe the belief that we can help people transform their work lives, and so do our contributors. Our experts come from a variety of backgrounds but have one thing in common: they are authorities on the job market. From journalists with years of experience covering workforce topics, to academics who study the theory behind employment and staffing, to certified resume writers whose expertise in the creation of application documents offers our readers insights into how to best wow recruiters and hiring managers, LiveCareer’s stable of expert writers are among the best in the business. Whether you are new to the workforce, are a seasoned professional, or somewhere in between, LiveCareer’s contributors will help you move the needle on your career and get the job you want faster than you think.

Many adults return to college only to drop out three weeks into their studies. Why? One of the most common reasons is that online learning is hard work. It takes time. It takes discipline. It takes quiet. How can you guard against prematurely dropping out? The first step is to look around your house and find a place to claim as your own. Some students have found a quiet space in the garage, basement, attic or laundry room. After you’ve claimed your study space, make sure everyone in the family understands it is your sacred spot. Put up a DO NOT DISTURB sign and enforce it! Even if you can’t follow all the tips for success in online courses, your odds of staying in school will increase if you find a study spot.


39) If your roommate is doing something that bothers you, ask yourself the following three questions: 1) Am I being reasonable in being bothered by this? 2) What's the best way to talk to my roommate about this? 3) What are some solutions to this issue? If all else fails and the issue is very important to you and you've talked to your roommate to no avail, talk to your Resident Assistant.
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