Eligible colleges or other post-secondary institutions must send Form 1098-T to any student who paid "qualified educational expenses" in the preceding tax year. Qualified expenses include tuition, any fees that are required for enrollment, and course materials required for a student to be enrolled at or attend an eligible educational institution. Read more…


It began as a serious article about college teaching mistakes. Then it morphed into an article published on HubPages.com entitled You Might Be a Redneck College Teacher If … Is there a serious lesson to be learned from this silly article? Know What You Need to Know Many of the mistakes new college instructors make result from assumptions … incorrect assumptions that is. Unlike what is suggested in the a ..... READ MORE
A good understanding of the coursework and expectations of the professors is crucial to passing and making good grades in any given course. Since in-person communication is not an option, make use of email, chats, forums, and other formats to communicate with fellow students and professors if you have any questions and need any clarification. In this way you can avoid misunderstandings from the outset, greatly enhancing your online college success.
For us onlooking or partaking upperclassmen, that feeling isn’t too distant. As a freshman, the sense of being lost in a big new world was exciting, but at the same time I treasured every bit of advice I could get. And there are still many things I wish I would have known then. Now that I’m a few years older, I thought I’d share some thoughts. More importantly, I went around and asked some of the most accomplished Penn students for what recommendations they’d give to freshmen.

TUESDAY, Dec. 10, 2019 — Bullied teens are more likely to develop mental health problems, and people with mental health problems are also more likely to become bullies, researchers report. Even though many studies have shown that being bullied can leave mental scars, “no studies to date” have tested the notion that mental health issues… Read More »
Perhaps you were class president in high school. Or perhaps you were a member of the honor society. You could have graduated in the top percentile of your graduating class; perhaps you were even valedictorian. Maybe your were in the honors program or the International Baccalaureate program. Actually, it doesn't really matter what you did in high school as you make the transition to college. High school success (or lack of it) doesn't automatically apply to college.

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College Teaching Tips will undergo a makeover during the next few months making it similar in appearance to the Adjunct Assistance website. Adjunct Assistance is now easier to read; and the new, user-friendly, design helps readers find the articles they want to read. User-Friendly Advice for Teachers College instructors – current and aspiring – can now easily find exactly what they are looking for on ..... READ MORE
Only include your GPA on your resume if you are a recent graduate, and only if it is above a 3.5. In most industries, a GPA is not a deciding factor in entry-level hiring. A few  still want it (investment banking comes to mind), but most do not. If you’re a recent graduate, you should also include any academic honors, such as scholarships, dean’s list, and cum laude status. Again, this is only for recent graduates. Everyone else should leave their GPA off the resume!
Never skip a study time. Always sit down at your station at study time. Do this even if you don’t have pressing homework to complete. Keeping a regular schedule will help prevent procrastination. If you find yourself sitting at your desk and looking at your books, but not reading, remind yourself that you only have to study for a short amount of time. Set a timer. At the end of that time, close the book and give yourself a break.
Since online courses are more independent and self-paced than in-person college courses, the process of studying can be a bit different than with in-person courses. Make sure to re-watch any lectures, videos, and/or slideshows that the teacher posts, take notes, jot down questions you have, utilize the class discussion board, do some outside research to fill in gaps in your understanding, and reach out to your teacher if any questions you have remain unanswered.
On your first study day each week, read any required materials and take notes. Go back a few days later to review your reading notes and work on any written homework or other assignments. Now that you have identified your regular study times, tell everyone in the family. Post a notice on the refrigerator that you will be studying at predetermined times each week. Ask family members to respect this time. Make sure everyone understands you are not to be disturbed during your study time.

Video: Tax Tips for Teachers Take Advantage of Two Education Tax Credits How to Calculate Your Lifetime Learning Tax Credit on IRS Form 8863 Guide to IRS Form 1099-Q: Payments from Qualified Education Programs Learn About the New College Tax Credit Sending Kids to College The Lowdown on Education Tax Breaks Video: Guide to IRS Form 1098-T Tuition Statement Video: What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? What is the Educator Expense Tax Deduction? What is a 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Tax Tips When Sending Kids to Private or Public Schools How to Report FAFSA College Money on a Federal Tax Return Tax Deductions for Voluntary Interest Payments on Student Loans What Are Education Tax Credits? Tax Tips for Teachers: Deducting Out-of-Pocket Classroom Expenses What is IRS Form 1099-Q? What Is the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit? Tax Tips for New College Graduates Video: Top College Tax Deductions and Credits Can I Deduct My Computer for School on Taxes? Cash for College: Tax-Free 529 Plans Video: Tax Tips for Students Bigger, Better College Tax Credit Video: What Is a 529 Plan Contribution? Information on 529 Plans About Student Loans and Tax Credits What is Form 1098-E: Student Loan Interest Statement? Taxes for Grads: Do Scholarships Count as Taxable Income? What Is the IRS Form 8863? Do You Have to Claim Pell Grant Money on Your Taxes? What Is the American Opportunity Tax Credit? What Is IRS Form 8917? Deduction for Higher Education
You don’t do that by going into your interview and talking about your views on symbolism in 1950s film noir. You do that by ensuring you gain practical experience while you’re a student, either by working part-time, or by doing an internship. Yes, part-time retail jobs teach important workplace skills, such as cash management, customer service, and inventory management. An internship can provide more “professional” experience related to your major. If you’ve held a job while working on your degree, or if you’ve done an internship, be sure to put those on your resume.
When adults—especially moms and dads—think about going back to school, many see no way to squeeze college into their hectic routines. But it is possible—and we’re here with tips for success in online courses. Attending college online helps with that time crunch. Not having to commute to a campus saves adult students several hours per week. These stolen hours can then be applied to home study time. Truth is, the average working American has about 30 hours of free time per week. That’s right: 30 hours. The key is learning how to manage your time tightly.
Many adults return to college only to drop out three weeks into their studies. Why? One of the most common reasons is that online learning is hard work. It takes time. It takes discipline. It takes quiet. How can you guard against prematurely dropping out? The first step is to look around your house and find a place to claim as your own. Some students have found a quiet space in the garage, basement, attic or laundry room. After you’ve claimed your study space, make sure everyone in the family understands it is your sacred spot. Put up a DO NOT DISTURB sign and enforce it! Even if you can’t follow all the tips for success in online courses, your odds of staying in school will increase if you find a study spot.

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This is the person who will help you with course conflicts, adding or dropping courses, scheduling of classes for future semesters, deciding on majors and minors. This person is a key resource for you -- and should be the person you turn to with any academic issues or conflicts. And don't be afraid of requesting another adviser if you don't click with the one first assigned to you.
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