A truly great resume should highlight your achievements and immediately answer the hiring manager’s top-of-mind question: “Can this person solve my problem?” Not only should the education section of your resume be concise, but it should also relate to the job you are seeking. If you’re a recent graduate, you’ll need to put a bit more focus on your education section since you likely don’t have a lot of professional work world experience yet. You don’t want to include every single course you’ve ever taken, but you also don’t want to merely list your credentials.
The one exception to this rule is in an academic or scientific curriculum vitae. Those fields are very concerned about educational history. If you are writing a true C.V., then you should lead with your education. Ensure that you list your degrees in order of hierarchy—you’d be shocked by how many people have extensive education sections in which their doctoral degrees are listed last! Include your thesis/dissertation topic and advisor, if applicable.
Some people seek college teaching jobs with no clear understanding of what it will take to succeed. This is the case for many new part-time, or adjunct, faculty members. An honest self-assessment can help a would-be instructor make the right decision, one that can lead to a rewarding part-time or full-time career teaching career. In some cases, however, the right decision will be to look for other employment. Th ..... READ MORE

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Eligible colleges or other post-secondary institutions must send Form 1098-T to any student who paid "qualified educational expenses" in the preceding tax year. Qualified expenses include tuition, any fees that are required for enrollment, and course materials required for a student to be enrolled at or attend an eligible educational institution. Read more…
Find mentors. Going through something yourself is often the best way to learn, but that doesn’t mean you have to re-invent the wheel entirely and can’t get guidance. Many of the world’s most successful people — from businessmen to politicians to writers to musicians — found a mentor early on who represented an ideal that they wanted to become and took a fervent interest in them.
A lot of problems first-year students face can be traced back to an illness that kept them away from classes for an extended period of time that led to a downward spiraling effect. Get enough sleep, take your vitamins, and eat right. If you haven't heard the jokes about college food, you soon will. And without mom or dad there to serve you a balanced meal, you may be tempted to go for those extra fries or cookies. Stay healthy and avoid the dreaded extra "Freshman 15" pounds by sticking to a balanced diet.
Holy cow, the universities make a boatload off of textbooks! Using one book for a semester (even with selling it back) can cost $100 plus! Many companies like Amazon sell textbooks cheaper than at universities and offer gift cards at a decent rate to sell them back. I had a great experience with the buyback program…much better than selling a book back for next to nothing at the school store!
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